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Rate the Last Film you Watched

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Con
Posted (edited)

Buried (2010)

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The Awesome: The genuine fear inducing thought of being buried alive. Now if you f*cked someone over real bad, yeah, you probably deserve it, but if you are just doing your job one day and some *sshole abducts you for ransom money, that has to be tough and I think that is where this film gut-punched me; the main character Paul (Ryan Reynolds) was just doing his job to feed his family back in the States and this happens to him. The film has one location and one live actor...and to make that work and be entertaining is no easy task and I think credit should go to the filmmakers even if it's our curiosity that keeps us there until the end. There is no break from the situation! No flashbacks. Nothing. We only see the inside of that wooden box, I'm going to refer to it as the "coffin"...anyways for 1.5 hours we do not go anywhere, we stay inside that coffin the entire time.

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The Good: Some of the phone calls are really gut-wrenching, especially at the beginning when we learn just how hard it will be for Paul to be rescued. The cinematography was good but I also felt a bit the lighting was inconsistent at times...but can't really get on the filmmaker for that as there are limitations of filming "inside a coffin". There is no denying that the story is scary or the situation. I mean, I know most people would never want to be buried alive but I think I rather have you dismember (dismemberment my biggest IRL fear) me alive than have you abandon me alive in a wooden box in the ground. I don't know if i could handle that, I have dreams of being stranded on streets and cities im not familiar with and those dreams scare the sh*t out of me because of the sheer hopelessness of being lost that I experience in those dreams...but this would be much worse. Just one fake out sequence, so that was refreshing and reminded me of how brilliantly that element was used in the film "The Descent". 

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The Bad: I have come across many reviewers that claim they "fast forwarded"...that's the point of watching, to live every second with Paul in that coffin, to feel that hopelessness. I know it's hard to make a film like this with all its intended limitations but I cannot get past the fact that just short of an hour into the film, Paul is finding new things inside the coffin...and while the items are fantastic and are deliciously logical, it's hard to think that Paul was not aware of those items beforehand! It's not like they were in another room...LMAO. I also felt that that whole revelation of the new items could have been handled better and im sure the screenwriter had several versions, I think having Paul use up some of those resources without knowing their purpose would have made for extra soul crushing fun!!!! Because imagine him being told something like..."that water wasn't for drinking, it was for cleaning the gadget so you can get out." Don't worry I didn't spoil anything, I was just using that as an example of why I feel that moment in the film could have been better. The ending was satisfying....so why am I putting this in the BAD section? well mainly because I thought it could have been more gut-wrenching and I get the whole "Mark White" thing, but it wasn't as satisfying to me or as impactful as it was intended. How would I have crafted the ending for a more gut-punching experience? 

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Spoiler:

 

Instead of giving us that hallucination moment that is kind of played out and predictable, how about if we hear Agent Dan Brenner's (Robert Paterson) voice getting closer from the outside as they dig Paul out...but then reveal that Agent Dan is actually an insurgent or defector (think John Walker Lindh-type) who has set this "Ransom Scheme". Imagine the dread I would have felt when I see this American soldier only to learn he is an enemy and Paul's suffering has only just begun. 

The Ugly: I know seven different versions of the coffin were used in order to get the many angles we see of Paul inside of it...but it was jarring at times and very distracting for me as I found myself not listening to the dialogue and instead trying to figure out if the coffin had changed depth. I mean, at the start it seems like Paul has literally 5-6 inches of space to move around and then in some later scenes it seems like he has more than a foot to move around and this fluctuation really distracted me and at one point even surmised that perhaps the coffin is more shallow at one end than the other but that is not the impression or image we see as some zoom out shots clearly show that the coffin is a perfect rectangle. The idea to change the phone’s language came way too late in the film mainly because when we see it being done it seemed so easy to figure out. 

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Final Verdict...3/5... I think the one thing that kept flashing in my brain was..."sh*t like this really happened in Iraq and is happening probably on every continent this very moment". Needless to say that the concept is what intrigued me...i guess I have a fear larger than dismemberment and that is being buried alive in a wooden box in the desert of Iraq. I appreciated having the kidnapper explain his side of the ordeal, yes what he was doing was f*cked up, but it was born from having his children blown up while they walked to school by a misguided American bomb. It really highlighted the absurdity of the entire conflict and how the revolving door effect will ensure NOTHING changes in that region. Buried was worth the watch and at times was very effective in filling me with dread. I guess I rather be shot dead than be left to my own mind in a trapped body...that is what I consider true horror and terror and one of the reasons I loved Ghost Stories (2018)...No, don't google Ghost Stories, just go watch it like I did...trust me. Anyways, don't expect Oscar winning performances or expect to see different characters as we only hear others, don't expect flashbacks or fully fleshed out sub-plots. It's just a guy buried alive in a box who is given a cell phone and he must use it to try and get himself out...the more you can put yourself in his position, the more you will enjoy the film as it goes on and  an ultimately appreciate what the filmmakers achieved. 

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Edited by Con
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omarcomin71
Posted (edited)

I watched Terrifier last night.  
A bit of a throwback to the 1980s slasher films. But I wouldn’t recommend this if blood and gore makes you squeamish. Holy sh*z! 
I had seen the trailer for this before and it looked kind of creepy and intriguing. Finally pulled the trigger after watching a video on YT on recommended movies on Netflix. 
@Con have you seen this? Curious of what your opinion is. 
Thumbs up as a blood and gore slasher film with a limited budget. But again not for the faint of heart. 

 

Edited by omarcomin71
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LimeGreenLegend

Sleuth

dir. Joseph L. Mankiewicz

Sleuth 1972 Authentic 27" x 41" Original Movie Poster Very Fine ...

Sleuth is a murder-mystery film directed by Joseph L. Makiewicz and written by Anthony Shaffer, who also wrote The Wicker Man.  It stars Laurence Olivier and Michael Caine, with fantastic support from Alec Cawthorne.  Olivier plays an upper class writer of mystery novels, Andrew Wyke, who lives in a grand manor with extensive gardens, including a hedge maze.  This is the only location in the film.  Michael Caine plays a working class hairdresser, Milo Tindle, who is starting to make a bit of money of his own.  Tindle is also having an affair with Wyke's young wife.  The film opens with Tindle arriving at the house, having been invited by Wyke.  This is their first meeting.  After some tense introductions Wyke reveals that he knows about the affair, and that he is ok with it.  In fact, he wants to help.  He's having an affair of his own and wants his wife out of the picture.  The problem is, she has become used to living lavishly, and Tindle won't be able to afford that.  So he has concocted a plan where they stage a break in, Tindle can sell the jewellery on the black market, Wyke collects the insurance and everyone is happy.  

If this sounds like I've given away a lot of the plot, don't worry.  This film is a twisting maze of mind games, deception and one-upsmanship.  Olivier and Caine play against each other masterfully, Olivier perfect as the preening, posh lord of the manor, and Caine is brilliantly set against him as a young man trying to advance in society despite his working class roots.  If there's one thing you should watch this film for, and there are many, it's the acting.  Most of the film is just the two of them sparring with words (mostly) and they were both nominated for best actor at that years Oscars.  There is also a great performance from the little known Alec Cawthorne as the local detective, but his role is incredibly vital to one of the biggest plot points, so I'll leave it at that.  (If you've seen the film, you know what I mean 😉)

Another brilliant thing about this film is the set.  The house itself is gorgeous, but the best thing is the set dressing.  The house is full of games and masks and costumes, showing off what Wyke's character is all about.  There are also a whole host of creepy automaton dolls who seem to be watching everything that happens.  Big shout out to Jolly Jack Tar the sailor doll whose laugh was recorded by Olivier himself, and the doll also appears in the recent Knives Out, which was hugely inspired by thus film.  The direction shows off all of these little touches, cutting to the dolls like cutting to a reaction shot of a real person.  It really sells a creepy, oppressive feeling that ramps up with the intensity.  

The script is sharp to a dangerous point, written by Anthony Shaffer based on his own award winning play.  Every line is a gem, being delivered with huge relish by Olivier when he says stuff like "I could copulate for England at any distance" when talking about his s*xual prowess, or when he snaps at Tindle calling him a "jumped up pantry boy who never knew his place".  

This, along with The King of Comedy and Brazil, is my favourite film of all time.  If you're looking for a film that is brilliantly written, performed by two of the greatest actors of all time, that has direction that perfectly serves the story, that is full of incredible twists and turns that are breathtaking when they happen, then you should check this out.  10/10

 

 

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Con
6 hours ago, omarcomin71 said:
@Con have you seen this? Curious of what your opinion is. 
Thumbs up as a blood and gore slasher film with a limited budget. But again not for the faint of heart. 

This has been on my To Watch List for over a year now. I began reading about it and stopped when I began to learn how brutal it is...so I’ve just been waiting to get the feels to watch it...the thing is, clowns don’t scare me and always a hard sell for me. But I’ve been meaning to watch it for the rumors of the gore. I tried watching Rocky Horror Picture Show last night cause I need to pay off a debt. lmao.

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LimeGreenLegend
7 minutes ago, Con said:

I tried watching Rocky Horror Picture Show last night cause I need to pay off a debt. lmao.

I'm waiting with

rocky horror picture show anticipation GIF

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Con
24 minutes ago, LimeGreenLegend said:

I'm waiting with

:D  the only version i could find last night seemed to be a remake? Definitely not the Tim Curry version. I will try again today. 

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LimeGreenLegend
1 minute ago, Con said:

😄 the only version i could find last night seemed to be a remake? Definitely not the Tim Curry version. I will try again today. 

Yeah, it's gotta be the original or nothing.  But you can't pick nothing 😛 

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LimeGreenLegend

Ran (Chaos)

dir. Akira Kurosawa

Ran 1985 Japanese B2 Poster at Amazon's Entertainment Collectibles ...

Ran (chaos or turmoil in Japanese) is an epic historical film from Akira Kurosawa, one of the greatest filmmakers of all time.  The story is a loose adaptation of Shakespeare's King Lear, but with sons instead of daughters.  Hidetora Ichimonji, an old warlord, decides to retire, dividing his kingdom between his three sons, Taro, Jiro and Saburo.  Saburo tells his father that it would be foolish to split up his kingdom and still expect loyalty.  For this he is banished.  Taro takes control of the main castle, but his wife, Lady Kaede, is whispering in his ear, manipulating him into casting out his father.  What follows is an incredible experience of a film.  I won't say any more on the plot, because you need to experience it for yourself.

The biggest thing that stayed with me after watching this is the colour.  The film is full of bright, vivid primary colours, yellows and reds and blues all clashing together on fields of lush green grass.  It's an absolute feast for the eyes.  That goes for the costumes too, I wanted to pause every scene just to examine the intricate details of the robes and dresses and armour you see.  The set design is as epic in scope as the rest of the film, with huge castles and crumbling ruins shot with a painters eye.  Seriously, you could pause this film at any moment and you'll have a masterpiece you could hang on your wall.

The performances are all incredible, from the biggest to the smallest role.  Tatsuya Nakadai is mesmerising as Hidetora, the old warlord.  He goes from the picture of nobility and strength to a hollow, broken shell of a mad old man as he faces the consequences of his violent past, in a way that will break your heart.  Daisuke Ryu as Saburo also goes through a brilliant transformation, starting the film as the hotheaded youngest son speaking out against his father and being cast out, and ending it in a very different place, which I won't spoil.  You will also hate Mieko Harada as Lady Kaede.  She is perfect as the manipulative wife of Taro, subtly pulling the strings at first, gaining more power for herself.  Her last scene is iconic, and very satisfying.  Another of my favourite performances is Peter as Kyoami the fool, jester for Hidetora.  Faithful, but not blind to what's happening to his master.  His loving frustration with the old man toward the end of the film is beautiful.

This is an absolute masterwork of a film from one of the greatest of all time, what more do I need to say? 10/10

 

 

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Con
Posted (edited)

The Hunt (2020)...2/5...Violent comedy that infuses both major American political views as parodies and catalyst for the story. Some jokes really hit the mark and some fall super flat. I liked that both conservatives and liberals were poked fun at and don't know why there was uproar at its release...why is it so controversial that one group wants to hunt another particular group? ------that's like every war film, every mafia film, and every Revenge of the Nerds film. And even then the film is purposely presented in a comical sense so it's narrative isn't supposed to be taken serious like say Halloween and I felt it was really dumbed down in places to ensure that nothing is taken literal. Crystal (Betty Gilpin) was a badass character and really carried the film's more serious moments. Sadly the film brings nothing new to the genre and I felt the rewatch value is not high at all and the ending played out like a Dollar Store version of Kill Bill's iconic kitchen fight scene. Why should you watch it? Cause its raining out and you want to watch another "Rich Folk's Human Hunt Club" trope and you aren't easily triggered by your political views used as jokes.

The Human Centipede 2 (2011)...2/5...Another film I found that had no rewatch value. The only time I felt repulsed was when I focused on what it would feel like to have no choice but to let someone sh*t in my mouth. I was appreciating Martin's (Laurence Harvey) effort at the surgery...until the stapler came out...not only did he have one handy, he had one with staples long enough to staple human flesh like that?...had he disabled part of their upper vertebrae, then I would have bought into the stapler bit. Its tough to get on the stapler when a man has turds fall out of his toothless mouth in the film, but that's where im at people. I think most people were grossed out by the feces and human-centipede but for me it was the idea of the nasty, nasty, nasty infections one would get in that setting...some crazy guy cuts into you and all this dirt, blood, and sh*t gets into the cuts...that grossed me out the most, I even felt my immune system activate itself as I watched those scenes, macrophages to the rescue! The fetus scene went a little too far into slapstick side. Oh the rubber *ss department....you should have gotten an Oscar, those *ss cracks look fn real. Why should you watch it? You read what I wrote above and said..."I gotta watch that!"

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LimeGreenLegend
Posted (edited)

A Field in England

dir. Ben Wheatley

A Field In England Woodcut poster | A field in england, Horror ...

A Field in England is a psychological horror film set during the English civil war.  The story sees an alchemist's assistant (Reece Shearsmith) and a couple of soldiers flee from a battle, deciding to instead go to a pub.  Stopping for some food on the way, they all eat a load of magic mushrooms.  They then find a strange wooden totem in a field with a rope attached to it, and when they pull the rope they seemingly pull a man from out of the ground.  This is O'Neill (Michael Smiley), an alchemist himself, and maybe the devil.  He takes control of the group and forces them to help him find a treasure buried somewhere in the field.  

This is a brilliant film.  It's unsettling and kaleidoscopic and hallucinatory, with incredible use of editing and sound design making you feel like you're falling into madness along with the characters.  Although there is some gore, this is a horror film of perception and the fragility of the human mind.  There's a scene where O'Neill takes Shearsmith's character, Whitehead, into a tent and the outcome is one of the most horrifying things I've seen on film.  There's no gore, just Whitehead, a rope, and an incredible performance matched up with complimentary direction.

This belongs firmly in the genre of arthouse horror with The Lighthouse and The Killing of a Sacred Deer, so if that's not your thing you probably won't enjoy it, but to me this is one of the best subgenres of horror out there, and this is one of the best examples of this trend.

A real trip 10/10

 

 

 

Edited by LimeGreenLegend
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djw180

Star Wars Episode 9: The Rise of Skywalker.

I'm so glad I didn't pay to watch this in the cinema. I guess this is a much a review episodes 7,8 & 9 as it is of this specific film. But the main thing I noticed was I couldn't remember all of what had happened in the previous two episodes and didn't really care. It may be visually stunning but the plot is utterly banal. It's starts so badly; why tell us about the mysterious voice Kylo Rens has heard and gone in search rather than actually put that in the film itself? This confirmed my fears about Disney taking over the franchise. Not a patch on any of the originals.

5/10

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djw180

Disturbia,

If you've not seen it the basic plot is teenager Shia Labeouf, still struggling with the recent death of his father, hits a teacher and is sentenced to 3 months house arrest with an ankle tag to make sure he can't leave the house. His mum, Carie-Anne Moss, cancels his online gaming accounts so for entertainment he starts watching his neighbours through binoculars, especially the rather attractive girl just moved in next door and the suspicious weird middle aged man at back of their house. He becomes convinced the latter is a serial killer that has been in the news and eventually he, his best friend and the girl next door start their own surveillance and discover the truth. It's quite good in places and builds tension well at times, such as when we see things on a computer screen that the characters do not see because they are looking in the other direction. But to me it can't seem to decide if it's a teen film or a re-interpretation of of Rear Window. Also I just don't get all the neighbours leaving their curtains open so that people, if they so wish, can look in. The girl next door particularly seems to have a bedroom almost deliberately set up for peeping toms getting a great view.


 

6/10

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LimeGreenLegend

Ta’m-e Gīlās (Taste of Cherry)

dir. Abbas Kiarostami

Taste of Cherry Movie (1997)

Taste of Cherry is a minimalist drama written and directed by Abbas Kiarostami, probably the most respected director in Iranian film history, and the winner of the Palme d'Or at the 1997 Cannes Film Festival.  It stars Homayoun Ershadi as Mr. Badii, a man suffering from depression who drives around the city of Tehran and its surrounding countryside looking for someone to help him kill himself.  He has dug a hole beside a tree and plans to take a load of sleeping pills and lie in it.  He needs someone to come check on him the next morning, helping him out of the hole if he's still alive, burying him if he's dead.  Over the course of the film, which is mostly set inside his car, he picks up three people who he tries to recruit.  A young soldier, an Afghan priest and an elderly taxidermist who works at a museum.  His conversations with these three people make up the majority of what little dialogue there is, and offers up different perspectives on life and what it means to be alive, particularly the old man, who was once suicidal himself.  

The direction really emphasises Mr. Badii's loneliness and isolation.  While in the car we only see one person in the frame at a time, even when he's talking to someone, keeping him separate from his fellow man.  There is no music on the soundtrack, apart from one song heard on a radio and a Louis Armstrong instrumental over the end credits, which again represents the void that he feels his life has become.  The setting also helps with this, with most of the film taking place in the vast open countryside where the only living thing is Badii himself, but even then he is isolated from this inside his car.  

The performance from Ershadi as Badii is fantastic.  He plays his depression with a determined subtlety that feels real.  We don't see him crying or breaking down, he is past that stage now, there's almost a calmness to him that is heartbreaking.  This is even more incredible when you learn that this isn't a professional actor, this is a guy who the director saw sat in traffic and thought he would be perfect for this role, and he is.  This is honestly one of the best film performances I've ever seen.  He has an almost haunting presence, like he's already dead.  I also love that we never find out why he wants to kill himself, like that is irrelevant at this point, and how we never find out if he actually does die at the end of the film.  Again, that's not important here, it's all about the journey.

The ending is brilliant too.  The final shots of the film are of Kiarostami and his crew actually making the film, like he's telling us that this is a story, a parable, a lesson to be learnt.  This is an incredibly life affirming and humane film, despite the plot, that really wants to expose the beauty of life without becoming preachy about it, and it is comforting, especially if you are feeling some sort of depression yourself, as I have recently.  This is a beautiful film that feels like a poem in the way it's constructed, each of his passengers being a different verse, and one that I highly recommend 9.5/10

The whole film is on YouTube if you want to watch it, which you should.

 

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